COSM

Announcements & Events

July 3, 2017

Previous student featured on CBS This Morning News

Stephanie Schopmeyer, previous ICPS lab student under Dr. Daniel Gleason, was featured on CBS This Morning News discussing work being done on Florida’s tropical reef. Visit CBS This Morning News to watch footage and learn about the conservation efforts to help save coral reefs in the U.S.


June 29, 2017

ICPS researchers at Gray’s Reef featured on WSAV

Graduate student Brianne Varnerin and ICPS director Dr. Danny Gleason were featured on WSAV talking about the experiences their research brings while at Gray’s Reef. Visit WSAV to see the video and special features.


June 21, 2017

Research at the Gray’s Reef mentioned in the Savannah Now newspaper

Dr. Daniel Gleason and graduate student Brianne Varnerin, along with other Georgia Southern faculty and NOAA members, were recently acknowledged for their work conducting research on the Gray’s Reef as part of an ongoing research to identify species and their habitat as well as working together to help monitor the behavior of certain species. To view the full article, visit Savannah Now. To learn more about Gray’s Reef and some of the ongoing research, visit Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary.


May 31, 2017

The U.S. National Tick Collection listed as one of the museums to see

NPR and Atlas Obscura recently talked announced some of the most unique institutions around the world including the U.S. National Tick Collection. Click here for more details.


May 18, 2017

2016 ICPS Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship winners featured in upcoming Georgia Southern Magazine

Lauren Neel and Matthew Scanlon, 2016 assistantship winners, are now featured in the new Georgia Southern Magazine issue online. Both students talk about how the assistantship has impacted their research and goal towards receiving their MS degree. For more information, visit the Georgia Southern Magazine here.


May 8, 2017

Institute for Coastal Plain Science Awards 2017 Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantships

The Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) is proud to announce that the recipients of the 2017 ICPS Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantships are Rebecca Scott and Mattie Whitesell. These students were selected after careful review of all submissions by a committee of ICPS faculty. Each student will receive a summer research stipend of $4,000 to further their graduate studies.

Rebecca is an M.S. student in the Department of Biology and is investigating the role that environmental factors such as water velocity, channel shape, and water chemistry play in shaping fish communities in Atlantic Coastal Plain streams. Findings from this study will be incorporated into conservation biology applications that are focused on Atlantic Coastal Plain fish populations and their associated habitat.

Mattie, also an M.S. student in the Department of Biology, is studying the factors contributing to hatching success in endangered loggerhead sea turtles that nests annually along the Georgia coast. Using field survey techniques, Mattie will investigate whether nest relocation increases hatch success and will determine which combination of biological and geological factors have the largest influence on hatch success.

The ICPS furthers the College of Science and Mathematics’ mission of transforming scientific knowledge into opportunities for economic development which are protective in our natural resources by 1) promoting, in coordination with public and private partnerships, interdisciplinary research and education directed toward understanding the physical and biological resources occurring below the Fall Line and their sustainable use and management, and 2) enhancing curation of the extensive natural history collections and promoting their use as research and education tools.

For the purposes of this competition, all applicants were asked to show how their research will lead to a better understanding of the physical or biological resources occurring below the Fall Line, and to demonstrate clearly how their project is interdisciplinary. This is the third year for the Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship competition.


January 25, 2017

2015 Georgia Southern MS graduate featured in The Pursuit, LSU’s College of Science official blog!

Alicia is currently a Ph.D. candidate at LSU in the Biological Sciences Department. Alicia’s Master’s degree in biology from Georgia Southern University was partially funded by a fellowship from the National Science Foundation GK-12 Program. Her advisor at Georgia Southern was Dr. Danny Gleason, Director of the ICPS. Click here to read more about Alicia’s current studies and journey to getting her doctorate degree.


January 4, 2017

2017 Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship at the ICPS

summer-graduate-student-research-assistantship-2017

The James H. Oliver, Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) invites Georgia Southern University graduate students in any scientific discipline to apply for a $4,000 summer research assistantship to support his/her thesis research efforts. Two such awards will be made on a competitive basis in summer 2017 with priority given to projects of high quality that fulfill the mission of the ICPS.

Eligibility

Students in scientific disciplines who are in good academic standing in the master’s program in the Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies are eligible. BS or BA students who have been accepted into the Master of Science program at Georgia Southern and will clearly be in the graduate portion of their degree program during the summer of support are also eligible. The research proposed should be directly related to the applicant’s completion of degree requirements and a student may receive this form of support only once.

All applications should be emailed to icps@georgiasouthern.edu

Deadline to apply is February 28, 2017. Applications will not be accepted after the deadline.


December 19, 2016

Dr. James H. Oliver Jr. featured in the latest article by American Entomologist (Winter 2016)

Dr. Oliver, founder of the Institute for Coastal Plain Science, recently spoke with American Entomologist about his upbringing and career working with ticks and mites. To learn more about Dr. Oliver and all that he has achieved throughout his life, you can read the article here.

 


April 1, 2016

Institute for Coastal Plain Science Awards Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantships

The Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) is proud to announce that the recipients of the 2016 ICPS Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantships are Lauren Neel and Matthew Scanlon.  These students were selected after careful review of all submissions by a committee of ICPS faculty. Each student will receive a summer research stipend of $4,000 to further their graduate studies.

Summer 2016 Fellowship Winners

Lauren is an M.S. student in the Department of Biology and is examining thermal sensitivity and thermal tolerance in populations of the Florida scrub lizard (Sceloporus woodi) that occupy both long-leaf pine and scrub forest habitats. Fragmentation of habitat poses a major threat to this species in the southeastern Coastal Plain and results from Lauren’s study will be used to predict how the Florida scrub lizard may fare in a globally changing climate.

Matthew, also an M.S. student in the Department of Biology, is investigating interactions between shrimp fisherman and sharks and sawfish along the Georgia coast. Specifically, Matthew will accompany shrimp fisherman to document how often shrimp nets get damaged and which fish species are causing damage. He will also develop and test a cost-effective electromagnetic deterrent system that will reduce damage to shrimp nets by repelling sharks and sawfish.

The ICPS furthers the College of Science and Mathematics’ mission of transforming scientific knowledge into opportunities for economic development which are protective of our natural resources by 1) promoting, in coordination with public and private partnerships, interdisciplinary research and education directed toward understanding the physical and biological resources occurring below the Fall Line and their sustainable use and management and 2) enhancing curation of the extensive natural history collections and promoting their use as research and educations tools.

For the purposes of this competition, all applicants were asked to show how their research will lead to a better understanding of the physical or biological resources occurring below the Fall Line, and to demonstrate clearly how their project is interdisciplinary.

 


 

March 4, 2016

3rd Annual “Beneath the Waves” Ocean Film Festival

beneath_the_waves2016_LML (1)

The Institute for Coastal Plain Science, in collaboration with the Center for Sustainability, will be hosting Georgia Southern University’s Ocean Film Festival for Spring 2016.  This unique marine science and conservation event will consist of short films ranging from 5 to 15 minutes long that will address both regional and international ocean issues. “It has often been said that if the same level of damage and destruction that is occurring in the oceans were occurring on land, humans would not tolerate it. The problem is that much of what is happening in the sea is out of sight, so out of mind. What we are hoping is that through this film festival we can give the audience a small window into how humans are directly impacting the sea and its inhabitants,” said Danny Gleason, Director of the Institute for Coastal Plain Science and one of the film festival co-organizers.

This event is free for all to attend and is made possible by Student Sustainability Fees at Work!

 


February 24, 2016

Deadline to apply for the 2016 Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship at the ICPS is approaching.  Apply soon!

Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship 2016

The James H. Oliver, Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) invites Georgia Southern University graduate students in any scientific discipline to apply for a $4,000 summer research assistantship to support his/her thesis research efforts. Two such awards will be made on a competitive basis in summer 2016 with priority given to projects of high quality that fulfill the mission of the ICPS.

Eligibility

Students in scientific disciplines who are in good academic standing in the master’s program in the Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies are eligible. BS or BA students who have been accepted into the Master of Science program at Georgia Southern and will clearly be in the graduate portion of their degree program during the summer of support are also eligible. The research proposed should be directly related to the applicant’s completion of degree requirements and a student may receive this form of support only once.

Application and additional details: ICPS Grad Student Summer Fellowship 2016

All applications should be emailed to Emily Christian (echristian@georgiasouthern.edu).

Deadline to apply is February 29, 2016.

 


 

February 4, 2016

Dr. Gleason featured in the new 2016 Georgia Southern magazine

Our very own Dr. Danny Gleason, Director of the ICPS, is one of two faculty members being featured in the “Curious Minds” article in the latest Georgia Southern magazine.  This article showcases faculty members who are producing innovative research in their area of expertise.  You can see more of the article here: Georgia Southern “Curious Minds”

 


 

February 1, 2016

New species of ixodid ticks publication by ICPS faculty members

Dmitry & Maria Apanaskevich in the ICPS recently published an article titled “Description of two new species of Dermacentor Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae) from Oriental Asia.”  In the highlighted article of the latest issue of Systematic Parasitology, two new species of ixodid ticks, Dermacentor tamokensis n. sp. and D. pseudocompactus n. sp. are described. Adults of D. tamokensis were collected from wild boars and vegetation in China, India, Malaysia and Vietnam, while those of D. pseudocompactus were found on a wild boar in Nepal. These findings increase the number of Dermacentor species known in the Oriental Zoogeographic Region to eleven.

January 27, 2016

2016 Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship at the ICPS

Summer Graduate Student Research Assistantship 2016

The James H. Oliver, Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) invites Georgia Southern University graduate students in any scientific discipline to apply for a $4,000 summer research assistantship to support his/her thesis research efforts. Two such awards will be made on a competitive basis in summer 2016 with priority given to projects of high quality that fulfill the mission of the ICPS.

Eligibility

Students in scientific disciplines who are in good academic standing in the master’s program in the Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies are eligible. BS or BA students who have been accepted into the Master of Science program at Georgia Southern and will clearly be in the graduate portion of their degree program during the summer of support are also eligible. The research proposed should be directly related to the applicant’s completion of degree requirements and a student may receive this form of support only once.

Application and additional details: ICPS Grad Student Summer Fellowship 2016

Deadline to apply is February 29, 2016.


 

October 16, 2015

Grand Re-Opening of the U.S. National Tick Collection October 28, 2015

The entire Georgia Southern University community is invited to join the James H. Oliver, Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science in celebration of the Grand Re-Opening of the U.S. National Tick Collection (USNTC) on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Math/Physics Building, Room 1022. Curators of the collection will be available to answer questions and light refreshments will be provided.

The USNTC is the largest continuously curated tick collection in the World with over a million specimens and about one-third of the World’s primary tick types. Its taxonomic breadth is enormous, including 96% of recognized tick species (approx. 900 spp.) and all U.S. tick species.

The USNTC has a remarkable history that began in 1905 at the Rocky Mountain Laboratory in Hamilton, Montana, where H.T. Ricketts discovered the role of ticks in the transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Investigations into the transmission cycle of the disease intensified and involved extensive tick collecting. These ticks were deposited at the newly created Rocky Mountain Lab and constituted the initial core of the USNTC.  The collection was donated to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in 1983. Due to the foresight and efforts of Drs. James H. Oliver and James E. Keirans, the collection moved to Georgia Southern on a long-term enhancement loan from the Smithsonian Institution in 1990 and it has remained at Georgia Southern ever since.  

The U.S. National Tick Collection has been closed to tours and visitors since November 2014 as it expanded into newly-acquired and newly-renovated space in the Math/Physics Building. The facilities obtained in Math/Physics represent a significant upgrade for this extensive and important collection by providing more space for specimens, storage, and research, as well as improved fire protection.

On campus directions to the USNTC are provided below. For any further questions contact Daniel Gleason (Phone: 912-478-5957, email: dgleason@georgiasouthern.edu), Director, James H. Oliver, Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science.

USNTC Directions

 


 

September 28, 2015

James_Costa

Professor heralds unsung pioneer of evolutionary biology in LeConte Lecture

Original: James T. Costa, Ph.D., director of the Highlands Biological Station and professor of Biology at Western Carolina University, will present a lecture titled “Indefatigable Naturalists: Wallace and Darwin on the Evolutionary Trail” on Monday, Sept. 28, at 7 p.m. in the Biological Sciences Building, Room 1109.

Contrary to popular thought, Darwin was not the first to propose that species change with time and that natural selection is the primary mechanism promoting this change. Costa’s lecture will highlight the parallels in thinking between Darwin and his sometime rival, friend and colleague, Alfred Russel Wallace. His insights will portray the two naturalists as “true equals,” heralding the significance of Wallace’s accomplishments, which have been largely overshadowed by Darwin’s.

Costa is the author of The Annotated Origin: A Facsimile of the First Edition of On the Origin of Species, On the Organic Law of Change: A Facsimile Edition and Annotated Transcription of Alfred Russel Wallace’s ‘Species Notebook’ of 1855–1859 and most recently Wallace, Darwin, and the Origin of Species. Costa’s fieldwork and scholarship range from social evolution and behavior to the history of evolutionary thinking.

Hosted by the Department of Biology and the Institute for Coastal Plain Science, Costa’s visit is funded through the LeConte Scholars Program, the oldest endowed visiting scholars program at Georgia Southern. Named for Joseph LeConte, a prolific naturalist and scholar who was born and raised in nearby Liberty County, this program has hosted such world-renowned scientists as Eugene P. Odum, Paul Ehrlich, Edward O. Wilson and Rita R. Colwell. Costa is the 25th speaker in the series.

The event is free and open to the public, and a reception at an off-campus location will follow the lecture.


July 27 – August 11, 2015
Coral Reproduction Workshop
From July 27 to August 11, faculty from the Institute for Coastal Plain Science (ICPS) and students from the Department of Biology will be participating in the third annual Coral Reproduction Workshop. This workshop will be held at the Reef Systems Academic Unit of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México located in Puerto Morelos, MX. Georgia Southern faculty participating will include Dr. Daniel Gleason, Director of the ICPS, and Dr. Lauren Stefaniak, ICPS Postdoctoral Associate; student participants will include Biology majors Ryan Bacon, Margaret Fritze, Keyona Miller, Emily Starnes, and Nick Trujillo. 
 
The participants will learn about coral biology, reef ecology, and reef restoration in the classroom, and will monitor corals for spawning in the field and conduct fertilizations and rearing processes in the lab. This workshop represents an extensive collaboration between several universities and government agencies in Mexico and non-profit organizations in the U.S. and Europe. Georgia Southern is proud to be the only U.S. university involved with this effort. For more information about this workshop see http://www.secore.org/site/newsroom/article/field-workshop-mexico-coming-soon-.120.html.

Last updated: 7/3/2017

JAMES H. OLIVER, JR., INSTITUTE FOR COASTAL PLAIN SCIENCES